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Thread EWB Web Server GZIP compression
Sat, Jun 18 2016 10:02 AMPermanent Link

Trinione

Is the EWBWS gzip enabled? If so, how can it be enabled? If not, can it be? The size and load time differential is quite significant.

Thx.
Sat, Jun 18 2016 1:00 PMPermanent Link

Raul

Globestar Systems

Team Elevate Team Elevate

On 6/18/2016 10:02 AM, Trinione wrote:
> Is the EWBWS gzip enabled? If so, how can it be enabled? If not, can it be? The size and load time differential is quite significant.

I don't believe it's supported at this time and would need Tim to add
support for it.

Depends on how urgent your need is you can wait for Tim to implement it
or use something like nginx as reverse proxy in front of the EWB web
server with gzip enabled (they can both be on same server, just change
ewb web server port).

Raul
Sun, Jun 19 2016 5:36 AMPermanent Link

Trinione

<< I don't believe it's supported at this time and would need Tim to add
support for it.

Depends on how urgent your need is you can wait for Tim to implement it
or use something like nginx as reverse proxy in front of the EWB web
server with gzip enabled (they can both be on same server, just change
ewb web server port). >>

Thanks, but that's an extra layer that I would think is unnecessary as this should be included in EWB-WS. I would hope and expect that this would be included in the EWB web server. Tim?
Mon, Jun 20 2016 4:19 PMPermanent Link

Tim Young [Elevate Software]

Elevate Software, Inc.

Avatar

Email timyoung@elevatesoft.com


<< Thanks, but that's an extra layer that I would think is unnecessary as this should be included in EWB-WS. I would hope and expect that this would be included in the EWB web server. Tim? >>

Let me be clear here - the EWB Web Server was never really intended to take the place of a mainstream, production web server.  It was put in place primarily to give everyone *something* to use for dataset/module support on the back-end for smaller installations (originally it was only for internal use in the IDE).  But, if you think that it's going to compete with mainstream web servers in terms of a feature set, you will be sadly disappointed.  I'm going to add features to the EWB Web Server as I get time to do so, and as they are warranted, but the main focus of EWB will always be the IDE/client runtime.

Tim Young
Elevate Software
www.elevatesoft.com
Tue, Jun 21 2016 12:36 AMPermanent Link

Frederick Chin

Tim,

/*
Let me be clear here - the EWB Web Server was never really intended to take the place of a mainstream, production web server.  It was put in place primarily to give everyone *something* to use for dataset/module support on the back-end for smaller installations (originally it was only for internal use in the IDE).  But, if you think that it's going to compete with mainstream web servers in terms of a feature set, you will be sadly disappointed.  I'm going to add features to the EWB Web Server as I get time to do so, and as they are warranted, but the main focus of EWB will always be the IDE/client runtime.
*/

I would like some clarification here based on the above. Are you saying that if I were to use DBISAM tables, I do not need to use EWB's web server but can use a server like Apache to manage the DBISAM tables?

Can I just drop DBISAM tables into a shared hosted server and use EWB written applications to ask Apache to retrieve and save data?

Frederick
Tue, Jun 21 2016 4:05 AMPermanent Link

Matthew Jones

Frederick Chin wrote:

> Can I just drop DBISAM tables into a shared hosted server and use EWB
> written applications to ask Apache to retrieve and save data?

I'm not Tim, but the answer is of course "no, not without some
programming, after which, yes". Elevate Web Builder is a great tool for
developing single page application web pages, and it can talk to
back-end servers to get information, and to make things happen. That
communication can be done via a whole load of common ways, and what the
server then does it up to it - you can change the server and the SPA
doesn't need to know. The server can talk to any database you want,
including, if the interface is available, to DBISAM or ElevateDB. But
the automatic facilities that make it easy to make a simple (but
effective) database tool out of the box will need a little programming
to convert - all the information is available to make this easy. You
can either do it using the standard formats, or you can do your own
thing.

Tim is in the process of finishing the PHP reference for implementing
the standard mechanism, so that will be a useful tool for anyone
wanting to implement it in other server side tools too.

--

Matthew Jones
Tue, Jun 21 2016 4:51 AMPermanent Link

Frederick Chin

Matthew,

Thanks for your response.

My message to Tim was because he responded to Trinione in such a way that it gave me the impression that the EWB web server (EWS) is of lesser importance compared with using the other heavy duty web servers.

I don't think EWS should be a poorer cousin to the other web servers because it serves a very important conduit between my EWB applications and DBISAM and EDB files. If Tim can say for certain that he intends to write modules that allows other web servers to manage DBISAM and EDB files, his response to Trinione would be true.

That's why I needed Tim's clarification because I was under the impression that EWS is an important part of EWB and adding new features to make it on par with or at least close to other web servers should be an important consideration as well.

For example, I am currently using stunnel since a year ago for my secure authentication with EWS. Is it as secure as it should be? I really don't know. Will EWS be enhanced in a reasonable time frame so that it can handle it without me having to continue to rely on a third party?

Frederick
Tue, Jun 21 2016 5:20 AMPermanent Link

Matthew Jones

Frederick Chin wrote:

> I was under the impression that EWS is an important part of EWB and
> adding new features to make it on par with or at least close to other
> web servers should be an important consideration as well.

Okay, well we are into opinion here, and Tim of course will be the
final arbiter. However, I don't think it is realistic to expect EWS to
ever match one of the primary web servers. Apache and IIS and the
Node.js have teams of people working on them. Microsoft are looking at
making their ASP.Net servers hundreds of times better in basic response
time, and it has a heck of a lot of power beyond serving JSON.

I can see a case for supporting HTTPS, and perhaps compression, but
that raises the bar in all sorts of ways in terms of maintenance. You
can't just put out HTTPS without keeping the TLS versions and cyphers
etc up to date to prevent vulnerabilities. But "outsourcing" that to a
tunneling tool, the problem is solved by someone else.

The other thing is that EWB is a tool usable by anyone, and doesn't
depend on any particular back-end. It works with any HTTP API ("AJAX")
so improving EWS only helps a section of the users, whereas improving
the core functions helps everyone.

But I also don't want to squash anyone's suggestion - maybe I'm wrong
here and it is important to most customers. I look forward to Tim's
input, and that of others. Maybe there is a case for open sourcing the
server so users can write enhancements and feed them back to all. That
might depend on the code and components used of course.

--

Matthew Jones
Tue, Jun 21 2016 6:37 AMPermanent Link

Walter Matte

Tactical Business Corporation


Tim clearly stated the role of EWB and the reason for the web server and it was completely consistent with my understanding of the product.

Look through the posts many of us don't use the web server for production, but use it during development.  I have seen posts where people use RemObjects for the back end, another used kbmMW as the back end.  I use RealThinClient and with StreamSec II for HTTPS.  RealThinClient can support GZIP.  A number of users have written webbroker or webservices or ISAPI DLL  with IIS.

The main thought in Tim's response, is that EWB is a single page web app development IDE.  It is not the next Apache or IIS.  While at the same time for low to moderate use solutions, the EWB webserver is adequate.

Just as Tim is focused on creating the EWB compiler and IDE for producing solid apps.  Products like RealThinClient focus their energy on robust HTTP.  

Walter
Tue, Jun 21 2016 6:48 AMPermanent Link

Walter Matte

Tactical Business Corporation


Sorry - two more points.

1. For me EWB handles the front end so Delphi like I am up to speed immediately.  

2. And with my backend RealThinClient I interact with any database.  Currently I have apps talking to DBIsam, EWB, and MSSQL.

But the joy of EWB to me is the Dataset and it has been extend ever further in the recent additions coming in 2.05.  Who wants to write 1000's of lines of code to load data into the screen and from the screen back into the database.

Further more, I use Unidac for accessing MSSQL.  So I can talk to all major DB's with this component set.

Awesome front end - multi db back end.

Walter
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