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Thread How to access database server data remotely?
Sun, Nov 23 2014 7:57 AMPermanent Link

kamran

Hi
There are so many ways to access data locally.
e.g. local workstation to local database server.

How can a database server that is in say london be accessed by a workstation in say belgium?
but without using the web interfaces and tools?

The solution I am looking for is directly through the TCP/IP method that is used in local area networks. So because now the internet is so fast it must be possible to connect from data from different cities just like in a local client server data access model.

Who has done this? and what Dbisam tools or components can achieve this ?

Or what others methods and tools can this be done with.

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.

Kind regards

Kamran
Sun, Nov 23 2014 12:16 PMPermanent Link

Raul

Globestar Systems

Team Elevate Team Elevate

On 11/23/2014 7:57 AM, kamran wrote:
> The solution I am looking for is directly through the TCP/IP method that is used in local area networks. So because now the internet is so fast it must be possible to connect from data from different cities just like in a local client server data access model.
> Who has done this? and what Dbisam tools or components can achieve this ?

This is exactly what DBISAM server does and has been for long time.
We've been using it this way for some 10 years now.

It's all already included with the DBISAM - standard edition has a
dbisam server limited to 5 connections. For real world use you'd need
the C/S edition .

Raul
Mon, Nov 24 2014 1:14 AMPermanent Link

kamran

Hi Raul

Thanks for your response.

Could you advise a little about how this is setup and configured to access a database say that is on a WAN e.g. different city based on your tried and tested methods over the last ten years. In particular:

q1. How the router needs to be setup to allow for external access by users ?
q2. What about the security of access? is there a danger here from hackers ?
q3. Does each user then need to have his own private session on the desktop (is that automatic)?
q4. Do I need to setup up different users and passwords for each client connect.?
q5. What about data integrity from so many people accessing the same database. Is that taken care of by setting up a new session id for each new user that signs in or is there a different way ?
q6. What about performance/speed issues?  are there any bottlenecks to consider?

The scenario I am looking at is:
Database server server in a location say in "london" running dbisam server on win 64 connected to a router.
Client access from anywhere/any city: so they connect to the database from home say or from an internet cafe.
Once they connect they are checked for security access from the client software that runs locally on their machine
just like a thin client. e.g. a piece of software that links to the database server and extracts any data needed from the server to the local machine for display. In any given day there might be as many as 100 users connecting at the same time to the database in question.

I have come across so many technologies that I am not clear where to go.
I am just after a simple solution that works and works well.

Thanks in advance for any ideas or tips you wish to share.

Kind regards

Kamran

Raul wrote:

On 11/23/2014 7:57 AM, kamran wrote:
> The solution I am looking for is directly through the TCP/IP method that is used in local area networks. So because now the internet is so fast it must be possible to connect from data from different cities just like in a local client server data access model.
> Who has done this? and what Dbisam tools or components can achieve this ?

This is exactly what DBISAM server does and has been for long time.
We've been using it this way for some 10 years now.

It's all already included with the DBISAM - standard edition has a
dbisam server limited to 5 connections. For real world use you'd need
the C/S edition .

Raul
Mon, Nov 24 2014 1:00 PMPermanent Link

Raul

Globestar Systems

Team Elevate Team Elevate

<<kamran wrote:
q1. How the router needs to be setup to allow for external access by users ?
>>

In general you just need to open the TCP port inbound (TCP 12005 by default) so the server is accessible from internet. At this point the server would be accessible by IP address - if you needed friendlier way for users to access it then you can also have a DNS entry pointing to your external IP

<<
q2. What about the security of access? is there a danger here from hackers ?
>>

As with any internet exposed device the risk is non-zero but considering DBISAM uses non-standard port (i.e. not part on normal scans), it is a binary proprietary connection and you can enable encryption on the link it's fairly safe. At least for us it has not been a problem.

<<
q3. Does each user then need to have his own private session on the desktop (is that automatic)?
>>

I'm not sure what desktop are you referring to - users will run the client application on their desktop which connects to server over TCP just for database access (there is no desktop access here).

<<
q4. Do I need to setup up different users and passwords for each client connect.?
>>
No but you can - depends on your app design.

<<
q5. What about data integrity from so many people accessing the same database. Is that taken care of by setting up a new session id for each new user that signs in or is there a different way ?
>>
Data is accessed thru a dbisam server so it's automatic. You will still need to handle things like 2 users editing same record but appropriate dbisam event is thrown in this case.

<<
q6. What about performance/speed issues?  are there any bottlenecks to consider?
>>
it actually scales very well.  Normal internet latency and things like large number of lookup fields in client app (drop-down lists and such) might result in large number of discrete queries.

<<
The scenario I am looking at is:
Database server server in a location say in "london" running dbisam server on win 64 connected to a router.
Client access from anywhere/any city: so they connect to the database from home say or from an internet cafe.
Once they connect they are checked for security access from the client software that runs locally on their machine
just like a thin client. e.g. a piece of software that links to the database server and extracts any data needed from the server to the local machine for display. In any given day there might be as many as 100 users connecting at the same time to the database in question.
>>

Yes - sounds fine.

Raul
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